How Engineers are Changing the World

While in college, Ryan Pierce became inspired by a quote on campus that read: “Be the change that you wish to see in the world,” by Gandhi. It was then that he realized that there was so much more to engineering than building things. Engineering was a vehicle through which we can change the world.

Today Pierce is an electrical engineer based out of Faith Technologies’ Green Bay office. He and the hundreds of other Faith engineers are part of an industry that is changing rapidly due to the digital age of modern technology – a far cry from the common misperception that this work is boring and repetitive, focused only on math and physics.

The transformation of engineering from purely industrial and manufacturing to an occupation bursting with technology and innovation have made it one of the most diverse careers around. “People have a preconceived notion of what an engineer is,” said Darin Marsden, Faith Technologies’ Director of Productivity Technologies. “There are more than 40 engineering fields with over 100 specialties, all using technology and creativity to find new solutions and better ways of doing things,” he said.

The Internet of Things (IoT), 3D modeling and conceptual design that is data driven are helping to create solutions based on outcome rather than function. “A key piece of data can help you understand an analysis so much easier, to help you become more green, lean and efficient. We are problem solvers, designers and innovators,” said Marsden.

Faith Technologies is a perfect example of engineering’s rapidly changing landscape. Just ten years ago, Faith focused on electrical contracting and employed only a handful of engineers. Today, nearly 180 employees work within the engineering area, including automation, BIM (Building Information Modeling) and detailing. There are an additional 50 employees in preconstruction or project management that have an engineering background.

As technology continues to advance, there are more opportunities to reshape the way we live, work and play. In the meantime, our growing team of Faith engineers are working hard to dispel the myths of engineering to inspire youth in our communities. They support and mentor students at multiple events to introduce the wide-ranging career opportunities and exciting potential for changing the world with cutting-edge technology.

Faith engineer Clare Hirssig is passionate about encouraging girls and young women to pursue the career. “I was lucky because my dad was an engineer and he encouraged me. I am starting to see more interest among girls at a younger age, so they are growing up learning that this is a field where they are not only needed, but can thrive in,” she said. She and several other Faith engineers serve as tour guides and teachers at the new clean-energy microgrid at the Fox Cities Environmental Learning Campus at Bubolz Nature Preserve. During these programs, students learn about the energy system of the future and how technology is helping to reduce our carbon footprint.

Whether they are mentoring scout troops, judging math competitions, or demonstrating virtual design, these engineers are inspiring young people to change the world through engineering. “It is important for anybody, no matter what your title is, to give back and help people who are just starting out,” said Pierce. “I like to think that it is one small step toward being the change and making a difference.”